Category Archives: Cloud

When was the last time the media hyped a “drone sighting”? I can’t even remember.

Reports to the FAA of “drone sightings”, used by Congress and the FAA to drive forth draconian remote identification and mandated national surveillance networks using drones, with the goal of pricing drone flying out of the public’s reach – were based on bad data and media hysterics, much of which was false reporting.

  • Remember the Aeromexico flight in late 2018 that had a collapsed nose cone? The media blamed that on a drone. Six months later the official investigation found it was due to a maintenance defect on the nose cone.
  • Remember the Gatwick Airport fiasco? The only confirmed drone sightings were of the fleet of surveillance drones operated by the Sussex Police over the airport.
  • Remember the temporary Newark Airport closure due to a “drone sighting”? That drone report was from 20 miles away from the airport and may not have even been a drone at all.

Take a look at this – drone sightings have magically disappeared: Drone Sightings: The Actual Non-Hyped Numbers Analyzed (Graphs, Trends, etc.)

After awhile, when the FAA isn’t stealing Youtube content, they seem to have been busy making up fake drone reports to justify a remote ID proposal that mandates all drones be connected to the Internet cloud, in real time, and used as part of a massive national surveillance program, collecting imagery and telemetry and potentially sending it to China. Brilliant. Not like any drones would so something like that.

The FAA’s primary goal is to make hobby flying of radio control model aircraft so expensive and cumbersome as to eliminate it entirely. The reason is to clear the low altitude airspace for AmazonGoogleUPS delivery drones. The FAA asserts that it and it alone owns the airspace in your front and backyards from the ground up. Literally, the airspace below your head when you stand outside is controlled by the FAA and they intend to use it for corporate delivery and surveillance networks. (See my comments to see how that works.)

Twitter’s lack of security comes into focus

The extraordinary hacking spree that hit Twitter on Wednesday, leading it to briefly muzzle some of its most widely followed accounts, is drawing questions about the platform’s security and resilience in the run-up to the U.S. presidential election.

Twitter said late Wednesday hackers obtained control of employee credentials to hijack accounts including those of Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, former president Barack Obama, reality television star Kim Kardashian, and tech billionaire and Tesla founder Elon Musk.

….

Wednesday’s hack was the worst to date. Several users with two-factor authentication — a security procedure that helps prevent break-in attempts — said they were powerless to stop it.

“If the hackers do have access to the backend of Twitter, or direct database access, there is nothing potentially stopping them from pilfering data in addition to using this tweet-scam as a distraction,” said Michael Borohovski, director of software engineering at security company Synopsys.

In 2010, Twitter reached a settlement with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission after it was found the company had lied about efforts to protect users’ information during an extended hack the year before.

Under the terms of the settlement, Twitter was barred for 20 years from misleading users about how it protects the security and confidentiality of private information.

Source: Twitter hack alarms experts already concerned about platform’s security – National | Globalnews.ca

Bloomberg’s “hacked” Supermicro server boards article comes under fire

We thoroughly evaluate the claims made by Bloomberg in their Supermicro China tampering stories and found them likely impossible or implausible at best. We take stock of sources and discuss the next steps calling for formal SEC and shareholder investigations of Bloomberg.

Source: Investigating Implausible Bloomberg Supermicro Stories

Apple and Amazon, both named as allegedly using the allegedly hacked servers, have denied the Bloomberg accusations. Apple has called for Bloomberg to retract the article. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security issued a statement appearing to agree with Apple.

The Bloomberg article, as noted in the linked story, appears to have numerous technical inaccuracies.

How to block the Chrome Software Reporter Tool (software_reporter_tool.exe) –

I noticed my PC was bogged down and the CPU cooling fan has powered up to a higher speed. What’s up?

Google claims the Software Reporter Tool scans your PC looking for malware that may interfere with the Chrome experience.  I’m not sure I want Google scanning and peaking inside my computer, at all of the files on my computer. I really have no idea what this app is doing or what information it is collecting, who has access to the data, how long it will be stored, and how it will be used. Since I seldom use Chrome on this PC, I went ahead and uninstalled Chrome. However, the following describes a way to prevent the tool from running. (I already run both Windows Defender and a second anti-malware application – the SRT seems superfluous.)

Source: How to block the Chrome Software Reporter Tool (software_reporter_tool.exe) – gHacks Tech News

Consumers said to want more #IoT devices for security, protection and willing to share that data with insurance companies

Specifically, consumers say they’d share more data with their insurance company in exchange for smoke, fire and water alarm systems (and presumably also theft) that send data to their insurance company.

“Consumers appreciate the safety and security value propositions of smart home products”

Source: Report: Nearly half of broadband internet households interested in IoT-based insurance | Insurance Business

Everyone wants to be inside your bedroom now, from your smart phone, to your Amazon Alexa device, to your set-top-box (which logs everything you watch) to your home security systems (which, in some cases, log everyone in and out and share with a network provider).

Loyalty Cards are used to spy on  your purchases, and not just with the vendor

The story of how that Sudafed ad got to me begins at Walgreens. As I bought tissues and Afrin, I keyed in my phone number so I could get loyalty points.

Source: Facebook Really Is Spying on You, Just Not Through Your Phone’s Mic – WSJ

Stores use your loyalty card to identify you and all of your purchases. Your purchase transactions are then sold to other marketing companies. This data, in turn, can and is matched to your Facebook account and other online data using the phone number that you gave to the store and to Facebook or Google.

Think about how Facebook, Twitter and other online services are constantly pestering you to give them your phone number. Once they have your phone number, anything else you do that is linked to your phone number – such as using a loyalty card when buying stuff at Safeway or Walgreen’s is then accessible.

Update: CONFIRMED. Facebook purchases your online retail store purchase data from companies like Axciom, Datalogix, Epsilon and others. FB even says so buried in their anti-privacy policy. Your email address, phone number and possible credit number are used to link your Facebook surveillance logs with your offline purchases.

Everyone is also using the tracking data that Google collects on your Android phone to monitor where you are. Remember, that too is tied to your phone number. As I described on my other blog, the Facebook dossier even tracks what apps you have on  your phone and data mines that to identify potential marketing opportunities.

Google and Facebook are doing highly invasive surveillance and almost no one understands what is being done or what this means.

 

Governments set to regulate and issue their own cryptocurrencies

Why the Bitcoin bubble may explode when it pops:

One reason for regulating blockchain-based cryptocurrencies, also known as digital tokens, is the growing concern that the virtual money they represent could be used for nefarious activities, such as money laundering. Cryptocurrencies could also be a threat to the current financial system because they have at times encouraged unbridled speculation and unsecured borrowing by consumers looking for a piece of the crypot action.

Source: Governments eye their own blockchain cryptocurrencies | Computerworld

Government or central bank issued, blockchained-based cryptocurrencies could be far more useful for legal transactions than the underground currencies like Bitcoin. Bitcoin is great for secret or questionable transactions that do not want to be tracked, of course, but most transactions are not in the camp.

(Note “blockchain” is an important bit of technology that has numerous applications other than cryptocurrencies.)